ADAM OATES AND CHOOSING THE RIGHT STICK

At the beginning of the 2013 NHL season the Washington Post published an interesting story about how Head Coach and former player (ok you should know who Adam Oates is) works with his players to ensure they are using the right hockey stick.  

The report claimed that Oates  studies how they are using their tool (as he puts it) and determines if he thinks they need to make a change (whether it be blade lie, curve depth, etc.).  It probably doesn't surprise you that Oates, or any other NHL level coach for that matter pays this much attention to detail. However, what is interesting is that he continues to make suggested changes for his players that he feels will improve their game.  

So if at the NHL level there are players not using the right stick how many of us in minor and rec leagues are slightly off?  What types of adjustments can the everyday player make to improve his/her game?  

Insiders, here is my challenge to you - Pair up with another player on your team (not on your line),  take a good look at each other's twigs and then watch the other take a few shoots, and how they play with it throughout a game.  Get together afterwards and share your thoughts.  I don't think you need Adam Oates on this one, but another perspective might prove valuable........? anddddddd if you have any questions as to what's 'right' or perhaps common is the better word, drop me a line and I'll be happy to weigh in.  

Until next time.......keep your stick on the ice! (and while its there maybe see if its lying flat? hahaha) 

Enough of me, here  is the article - http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capitals-insider/wp/2013/10/01/adam-oates-and-hockey-sticks/ 



Joey Walsh
Joey Walsh

Author

I have worked with Hockey Canada, the Vancouver 2010 Olympics, Hamilton Tiger-Cats, and Brock University. But now I'm all about hockey sticks. A passion and love for sticks as a child has blossomed into a full on obsession as an adult (if you can call me that).



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